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  • On Guatemala

    Hi Givologists! Rachel here. Today we’re looking at Guatemala. A question to think about: how can we maintain the quality of education across different regions within a country? Please feel free to leave any comments, insights, questions below! Ten Facts about Education in Guatemala (1) Primary school attendance (6 years, usually ages 7-13) is [b]free and compulsory[/b]. However, in more rural indigenous areas, there are few primary schools available to children. (2) At the secondary education level, students have a greater range in what they can study; though most study teaching or bookkeeping, some schools also offer agronomy, auto-mechanics, computers, secretarial services, and tourism. (3) [b]One half [/b]of the 14 million people of Guatemala are Mayan. (4) Less than 30 percent of indigenous girls attend [b]secondary[/b] school. (5) However, Guatemala has undergone an increase in [b]primary[/b] school enrollment rates (to almost 100 percent) in the past four years in Guatemala...
  • The Economics of Education

    - Written by Priyanka deSouza [img]/images/user/1842_5775248825513991243.jpg[/img] [font=Georgia, Utopia, 'Palatino Linotype', Palatino, serif]In his book, ‘The Economics of Education’, Daniele Checchi provides enrollment ratios in primary school education systems across the world. This indicator shows that post World War 2, an increase in school attendance is observed across the globe. By the start of the 1990s, many countries had succeeded in achieving 100% primary school enrollment rate. However, while OECD countries saw an almost complete saturation for secondary education as well, all the others were lagging behind. [/font] [font=Georgia, Utopia, 'Palatino Linotype', Palatino, serif]Why is this so, given the clear benefits of education? [/font] [font=Georgia, Utopia, 'Palatino Linotype', Palatino, serif]Evidence presented by Dr. Checchi indicates that labour market participation increases dramatically as people obtain more and more education. Interes...
  • Disparities in Rural Education: Romania

    Written by Julia Tofan Hi Givologists, this week we will be looking at education in Romania! [b]Curriculum[/b] In Romania, children begin kindergarten at the age of 6. They typically attend a half day program in which they learn reading, math, science, religion, Romanian, and foreign language skills. From a young age, children are taught to respect their teachers and elders. In primary school, students spend a lot of time preparing for the 8th grade test that is used to determine whether they get accepted to high school, and if so, which one. Students study literature, math, and geography in hopes of succeeding on the test. Those who are not accepted to a high school may go on to vocational schooling or end their studies. In primary school, children often participate in after-school activities like sports teams. Children who can afford tutoring often get tutors to prepare for national tests, study unique subjects and foreign languages, or improve on the skills they are learning in s...
  • Givology Chapters: What do they do and how can you get involved?

    Written by Julia Tofan [img]/images/user/1842_9754475059402250269.jpg[/img] [b]Starting a Chapter[/b] Givology chapters bring together members from cities, schools, and universities to take action and support Givology's students and projects, furthering Givology's mission of making education accessible to children all over the world. Givology currently has about 30 chapters across the United States and internationally in South Korea, Hong Kong, and Vietnam, and we hope to keep on growing with your help! You may be wondering what Givology chapters have done in the past and how you can start a chapter too, so we talked to the presidents of some of our most active chapters to see how they have supported Givology students and projects and how others can get involved too. Among many ways of giving back, Givology chapters fundraise, educate, and increase awareness of education in developing countries. [b]Chapter Responsibilities[/b] Chapters are responsible for raising awareness a...
  • Why Are Students Leaving Nepal?

    Hi Givologists! This week, we’ll be taking a look at the education system of Nepal. Personally, I was not very familiar with the education system in Nepal, or the history of the country itself, and was able to learn a lot just by googling Nepal. [b]Eight Facts about the Education System of Nepal[/b] 1. In 2009, Nepal lengthened free education from 5 years to 8 years. 2. The academic year starts in April and ends in March. 3. Before 1951 (and subsequent political reform), education was mainly reserved for only about 250 students, including the royal family and the wealthy. 4. There are three secondary school types: community schools (run by the government), institutional/ private schools, and higher secondary schools (which provide education after the primary and lower secondary education levels are completed). 5. Following completion of higher secondary school (a total of 10 years of education), students are required to complete a three hour long School Leaving Certificate (SLC) e...