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  • Global Education and Technology: How The Pandemic Changed Education Forever

    This is the first issue of a recurring series which will examine more closely the state of EdTech in different countries around the world. Along with the arrival of the Covid-19 pandemic in early March came the sudden global shift from the classroom to the virtual setting, as schools around the world were forced to shut down and develop plans to teach students through online learning platforms. More than 1.2 billion children worldwide transitioned to virtual learning as a result of the mass school closures, marking the largest “online” movement in history. While online and virtual learning have traditionally been used in temporary situations such as the aftermath of a natural disaster, the longevity of our current crisis has generated speculation on what lasting effects it will have on the post-pandemic era, as well as the possibility of remote education being a viable alternative option for the future. Though some are in favor of an immediate return to the physical classroom, other...
  • The Future of Chinese Education

    After the destruction and bloodbath of Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution and Great Leap Forward, Deng Xiaoping, now in control of the CPC (Communist Party of China), began a process of economic liberalization. 40 years later, over 800 million Chinese have been lifted out of poverty, and the country stands of the brink of overtaking its main rival, the USA. Though its moment of the world-stage is certainly not set to fade away soon, it faces many issues: an aging population, a lack of water, and an insecure populace. One overlooked aspect, and one essential to the future of China, is education. Since the times of the now baroque dynasties of ancient China, education and merit have been cornerstones to Chinese culture and philosophy. Modern China is scarcely different. Severe competition, according to the New York Times, “begins at elementary school where children under 10-years-old struggle to get the best grades.” This reflects a key issue within the Chinese school system: the Gaokao...
  • An Auction For Students, By Students.

    The COVID-19 pandemic has changed our lives completely, forcing us to rethink our routines and how we conduct things. It has certainly been a time of hardship for millions, and perhaps you, the reader. Among the institutions that have fared the worst, education certainly ranks among their numbers. Education around the world has struggled, a lack of schooling and in-person learning impacting well over one billion children. The crisis has forced us to rethink the way we educate, and to reevaluate how we as humans learn. But within the education community, those who have faced the greatest perils are those from other countries: international students. Joanita Senoga started Circle of Peace International (COPI) in 2010. From her own lived experiences, she found a passion for teaching and helpful others, and started COPI as a way to help Ugandan students who had just arrived in the United States. COPI has provided education, housing, and shelter to countless Ugandan children and students...
  • Education and Access: A Geographic Divide in Nigeria

    In Nigeria, education levels display sharp regional disparities, especially between the northern and southern halves of the country. This geographical cleavage has played a role in Nigerian politics since the beginning of the Fourth Republic in 1999 due to ethnic and cultural differences between the zones. These variations in identity have been compounded by a lack of healthy political discourse and economic disparities between the north and the south. While the south is traditionally wealthier, safer, and equipped with better infrastructure, the north is much poorer and suffers from instability due to the terrorist group Boko Haram. All of these factors combined have influenced the sphere of education, leaving young students in the north much worse off than their southern counterparts. In Nigeria, the overall attendance rate for 6-11 year olds in schools sits at 61%, a dismally low figure especially considering that primary, elementary, and middle schools are free and mandatory. Ho...
  • Education and Access: Educational Inequality in India

    In 2009, the Indian government passed the Right to Education Act in what became the state’s strongest support of educational rights and opportunity in years. This landmark policy, which made education both free and mandatory for students between the ages of 6 and 14, also eliminated blatant educational discrimation based on race, religion, sex and other personal factors. However, while discrimination is not legalized, there is a clear inequity in education that prevents women from reaching the same level of academic achievement as their male counterparts. Key among obstacles that women face are poverty and misogynistic cultural expectations in which women are still seen as primarily homemakers and care-providers. Sexism, while not state-sanctioned, is often enforced by teachers in the classroom, especially for students at a young age. For these children, who are still developing, pervasive sexism is extremely damaging and can actually convince them to operate within India’s rigidly ...